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, he had been governor of virginia, ambassador of france, secretary of state, vice president of the united states, member of the congress. author of the decoration of independence. it's one of the few people in english history have been evaluated or inspected as closely as thomas jefferson was before he became president of the united states. people were looking at him and saying this is the guy we want. this is the person who should be president. >> host: the opponent said this isn't the guy we want. it was a close election. >> guest: it was. it was a strange election. >> host: it was strange election. it was hard fought. he had a lot of animation. you're saying, i guess what you're really saying is that both the supporters and the opponents knew who they were talking about. >> guest: partly that. what i'm saying is that especially when parties become ideological. any democrat is going different from any republican or any democrat is going different from any federalist. if you're measuring individual leader impact you shouldn't measure the democratic you should measure agains
quarter. the eu, banking -- things like nap but, again, still down. >> not great news for france if we start to look at some of the indexes. there's a lot of focus on this economy. >> exactly. and the weakest spots, given that it's the second largest economy. now, we did see that return to growth for germany, which is a positive and will be a good gain forward. but say order box, very weak. demand, very weak. business confidence very weak and this is going to be hitting activity indicators going forward. >> even though the manufacturing side of it disappointed, the services was stronger. while services is a big part of the economy, it's where we're trying to see the rebalancing in the german economy happen. from that point of view, probably a rather encouraging development. >> it is interesting. it's also very exportwise. what we saw on these numbers was german exports falling sharply again. and this is just signaling that global economic conditions, soft patch very weak, particularly for the region -- i'm sorry, within the eurozone itself. >> and it's consistent with the weakening glo
justices in the land would take that sort of activist role and you mentioned france, dan, that's scary. the back drop of this whole presidential year is europe. we know where the path leads. and the turmoil and welfare states and how unsustainability and the high unemployment that comes with them and that was the back drop of our presidential campaign. >> paul: okay, the voters said, yeah, we're going to keep moving in that direction, kim. i mean, how, what do you think the electorate is here, behind the choices that jason just suggested they might be? >> barack obama won this election by very effectively making this a referendum about his opponent, mitt romney. so if you went out and you asked most americans, do you think barack obama did a great job in his first term? do you want significantly higher taxes? do you want the government to do nothing about spending? are you happy with obamacare? most would say no, but in the end the choice was between a president who said things aren't great, but i'm still going to try to make them better and a guy he painted as not having a plan and no
lead shriver to give up on what had become an impossible task and to take the ambassadorship to france. when the democrats met that summer in a stormy chicago, shriver's name and came up for the vice presidency. in fact, he had an acceptance speech written and reservations on the flight from paris to chicago. but once again the kennedy family still grieving from the recent death of robert raised an objective in favor of ted. so shriver remained in paris until 1970. his success and repairing the alliance with france weekend by a disagreement about the vietnam war had prompted president nixon to retain him in office. not long afterwards came the 1972 election when the democratic nominee george mcgovern was forced to drop his running mate, and eventually through a process of elimination designated sargent shriver as his choice for vice president. the election was a disaster from the governing shriver who only one massachusetts and the district of columbia. but perhaps the final word came 18 months leader as the watergate scandal unfolded in the bumper stickers appeared today to read an ou
considered for an ambassadorship to either england or france. you can bet i have something to say. and i really do. california tax pain could be arizona's gain. we talked to a mayor who's trying to lure businesses away from the formerly golden state. a reporter with the sporting news doesn't like tattoos. and says most quarterbacks do not have them. now, he's being labeled racist because of those remarks. we'll talk to him next hour. yeah, he's here. remember, we want to hear from you, send you e-mails varney@foxbusiness.com and please comment on tattoos. i personally hate them. now, seven early movers-- somebody is olling their eyes off camera. and pep boys post a loss on weak sales and down it goes. the drug maker jereon, says it has stopped developing its treatment for brain cancers and cut the work force by 40%, there it goes. and dividends for the next three quarters and all of them early, the stock is now up. and profit rises at the home builder, toll brothers and the company said new orders rose sharply. up goes the stock. and tellabs, another special cash dividend. up it goes. t
with what's happening there. >> okay, rick, huge in france. we know french economy not that good. women want to make some money during this period. france is strong for you. >> we've grown, almost doubled the company in the last five years in france. we're the biggest company of our kind in france. we're the largest seller of cookbooks in france. we had some issues the first two quarters, during the election, as you know, most of the consumers sat on the sidelines. we're starting to see it come back to life again. so we feel very good about france. ditto germany. >> isn't that incredible. >> rick, 52-week high when compared to avon. incredible. thank you so much for joining us. >> good to be here. >> good to see you. >> all right. stay tuned. sfx- "sounds of african drum and flute" look who's back. again? it's embarrassing it's embarrassing! we can see you carl. we can totally see you. come on you're better than this...all that prowling around. yeah, you're the king of the jungle. have you thought about going vegan carl? hahaha!! you know folks who save hundreds of dollars by switching to ge
action. france called for aid, nothing happened. turkey called for safe haven, nothing happened. everybody is looking to the united states. unfortunately, it is the same position since august of last year, which focused more on the target sanctions and all of that. unless there is actually a change in the u.s. position to take more action, i do not think something will change in the military. building a central command of the free syrian army, that needs training, international assistance. that is something only the united states can do. >> do you have a follow up question? >> my question is, you have said the days of asad are numbered and it is only a matter of time before he falls. what can we expect to happen with them when he falls? will we see a scene similar to libya where his body is dragged through the streets? will he be tried in syria? what do you envision to happen, and what do you hope to happen? >> that is difficult to answer. we know the days of the regime is approaching. that may take one year or more. we see that with the reluctance and the hesitance of the inter
't an opportunity. >> in the 1920s it game clear that the victorious powers of the united states, france, britain weren't prepared to enforce the global order that they had imposed at thefo versailles settlement. and it became obvious to countries like germany and the soviet union that this they could violate with impunity. in 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world wharf this -- war of this regime that wanted to revise the structure of global power and the status quo powers who weren't prepared to enforce it. there was one power and under this administration -- >> is iran the test case for whether or not these countries are going -- europe and the united states and in particular are going to enforce this world order? >> look, you have three presidents, president clinton, bush and obama have said explicitly that a nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across the flesh hold with no opposition, that will demonstrate to other would t be aggressiveha regimes that there is no comp on the street. and that's what is happening. >> is this the year for the showdown
growth. france for 40 years has grown numb to% real gdp and 8% unemployment. they think it is normal. the good news is america doesn't think it is normal and you have to keep pounding the table that this isn't normal. it is not good. so do i. the only way to get back up to good growth is to cut the size of the government. i still believe we have eight to ten years even on the crazy course we are on right now before we are anything like one of these european countries. this is still an amazingly powerful entrepreneurial place. i am betting on the entrepreneur and even though the government keeps making a mistake after mistake after mistake. >> i like the optimism but i have to disagree with you in terms of fourth quarter growwh. most economists say it we are doing ok now in the third quarter we did at least but the holiday quarter, the santa claus rally everybody spending money for the holidays but most economists save gdp will come down in the current quarter but you say it will go up. i don't know if i believe you. >> i think gdp will be weak in queue 4 probably under 1/2%. it could
to bloomburg news. the editor of vogue may be ambassador to france. the white house had no comment. those are the headlines. that happens all of the time. ambassadorships are favors. 92 but what is her qualification aside from being editor. >> brian: and supporter of mrs. assad. >> gretchen: if you went back in time and look at other ambassador ships >> chris: it could doesn't go to her could go to mr. blackwell. >> brian: finallyy a royall baby bump. kate middleton is meg frant. this morning a scare and why she's in the hospital. >> steve: little boys as well . one making a mission to get a easy bake oven to make changes. call brian on the cell phone and all of you folks in indiana know the number. share the number. ♪ (phone ringing) um... uh... um... hm... umm... uh... oh ! the windows phone 8x by htc on verizon. it features easy to navigate live tiles that are simple to customize. just pin what matters most right to your homescreen. exclusively with data sense-- a feature that makes the most of you plan. only on verizon. i've been fortunate to win on golf's biggest stages. but when j
possibility similar to france and china and our chairman here included to that. the recent gao preliminary assessment of california's cost estimates show california high-speed rail authority has secured 11.5 billion from federal and state forces and still needs a shortfall of 57 billion to move forward. to put this investment into the 1950s, congress took old action to invest in its infrastructure and create a system. the system to be five years to build and after several editions a total length. the cost of construction has been estimated at over 425 billion in today's dollars that we're making that same decision. cert and we shouldn't afford at this time. urban mobility report by texas transportation institute found the cost of the slow speed but we currently have on long delays and endless congestion can dniester cost the united states over $100 billion annually. now it's time to make the investment for alternatives to congested highways and simultaneously create jobs. the intercity passenger rail service is one of those alternatives that many speed trumps long delay that faces our nati
-speed rail possibility similar to france and china and our chairman alluded to that. the recent da 0's larry assessments shows that california high-speed rail has secured $11.5 billion from federal lands state and still needs a shortfall of $57 billion to move forward. to put this in perspective, in the 1950s congress had action to invest in infrastructure and create an interstate system. the initial system took 35 years to build and after several additions highway system is a total length of 47,182 miles. the cost of construction has been estimated at $425 billion in today's dollars. so certainly we should move forward at this time. in urban mobility report by texas transportation institute found the cause of slow speed, what we currently have, on delays, and misconception continues to cost the united states over $100 billion annually. now is the time to make that investment for alternatives to congested highways and simultaneously create jobs. inner city passenger rail service call one of those alternatives, for delays on crawling speeds that face the nation's inner state today. northeast
for receiving the national order of the french legion of honor, the highest declaration that france bestows for meritorious service. i want to recognize him for his unwavering service to his country during world war ii and it's truly a privilege to honor a constituent who so exemplifies patriotism and the american spirit. established by napoleon bonaparte in 1482, it's a merit based distinction. the order's motto, honor and fatherland, reaffirms the celebration of patriotism and service for its recipients. victor decarlo was drafted into the army two months after he graduated from pittsburgh shindly high school in 1944. he arrived in france in 1945 and was assigned the responsibility of aiding the allied forces in reversing gains made by the german army. he first saw combat in the most -- in a region by helping forces breaking through the infamous siegfried line, a 390-mile defense system set up by the german army along the country's western border that consisted tank traps and manned bunkers. after successfully breaking through the siegfried line, he headed north to the famous battle of th
. greece unveiling that $10 billion eurobond buyback. a 52-week high in france and germany. our road map this morning begins in washington where fiscal cliff negotiations according to the "times" has "collapsed." at least for now. with less than a month until the deadline, who blinks first if anyone? >> goldman takes dell from a strength to a buy. is it time to look at the stock and maybe even other players in the beat up personal computer sector? >> manufacturing data out of china. not bad. 50.6. that's the highest in seven months. although shanghai again trades lower even europe's pmi improves a touch in november. first up, we're one month away from the fiscal cliff and so far the white house and congressional republicans are still in disagreement over how to reduce the deficit and avoid a raft of tax hikes and spending cuts. yesterday our own jim cramer and maria bartiromo were on "meet the press" and cramer had a message for fellow panelists and father of the anti-tax pledge, grover norquist. >> most ceos are republican. they're on board. they're not on board with you. they're not on
is set to open below 13,000. markets in europe mixed after a shortened session in the uk, france and spain. our road map starts right where we were months ago, waiting for the 112th congress to agree on a debt reduction package. the senate convenes at 11:00 a.m. >> the dow had its worst day in a month on friday. set to close december with a loss. the question is, does it continue to sell off if there isn't an accord in congress. >> we will always have china. manufacturing pmi data from last night is the best in 21 months. can we finally say the chinese economy has been stabilized. >> but of course, we start in washington. as you know, congress comes back today. the house gaveling into session now with legislative business starting at 10:00 a.m. the senate returns at 11:00 a.m. eastern. there are only a few hours left to get a deal done. eamon? >> you're already hearing people talk the way they talk on new year's day. a lot of people wish they could go back in time and do things differently. that's the way people are talking in washington about this fiscal cliff. feeling as if thi
before the house gavels in at 2:00 p.m. eastern. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, france, -- friends, this is a singular honor to be a guest in this temple of civic life. thanks to all the good people for making this possible, to my publisher, the staff that are manning the barricades outside. my novel is debt crisis and the future of the world economy. i will be arguing that there is no such thing as a debt crisis. there is no debt crisis in the united states of america and europe, and there is no such thing as the debt crisis in my own country, which is nevertheless being consumed by debt. you know the joke about balloonist. the balloon has been blown off isrse, and at some point they no such thing as a debt crisis. manage to gain control of the balloon and lower it above a farm. the farmer comes out and looks up at the balloon and one of the balloonists says, excuse me, sir, where are we? and the farmer says, you are in a balloon. the balloonist says, he must be an economist. precisely accurate, and hopelessly useless. [laughter] we have a doctor here amongst us. imagine if you ha
in switzerland, netherlands, sweden, france, germany do better than us? how is that possible? because of you, washington. it's because of you. we've been kept back all because of you. second, before our politicians stepped in with their intransigence and anger, we were about to have an explosion in earnings. retail was as strong as i've seen it in a decade, autos back incredibly robust. and that's just the beginning. because all the pent up demand. we're running short of office buildings, shopping centers, apartments, homes, these are the hiring sectors, all this blather about helping the small businessman of subchapter "s" for private and middle class, you want to help them? give them a deal, any deal, just get out of our way for heaven sakes. our country is starting to get so competitive, again, that businesses building things over there now want to build them here. tim cook tells brian williams that his company's going to make macs in this country. we're better than china. meanwhile our energy costs are plummeting courtesy of the cleaner, cheaper fuel, natural gas. so cheap here it can be
from a climaxed during subsequent visits to england and france. in london he attended a gala luncheon with the head of the canadian pacific railway and even better he met sir robert powell, founder of the boy scouts. when he was in paris seesaw around the world in 80 days, a very popular stage version of the novel that had been playing for decades. he watched a copy of the novel being printed expressly for him down in gold and embossed with his name on the cover. he then met jules verne's grandson who escorted him to grandfather's grave. they're surrounded by local boy scouts he later wreath with the message in memory of jules verne, from his greatest admirer . avoided aviation in order to make some kind of point about their place in the world. bicyclist who were not from the western imperial powers began to rebound and the bicycle as a peaceful way to see the world. certain cycle the world from 1901-1904, gathering admiring newspaper accounts as he did so, but because he did not publish his own narrative of the journey, he remained better known within asia and beyond. later pleased t
the way up to the recent history of revolutionary france, no republic had ever survived such a calamity as the civil war. and so, the people who knew their history, in the fevered climate of washington d.c. at that time, there was endless talk of the need for a military tater to replace the seemingly bleak lists elected civilian that lived in the white house. mcclellan himself toyed with the idea of. quote, i almost think if i were to win a small success now i could become teeter. he wrote to his wife. and he andy gloried in his newspaper nickname, the young napoleon. he then posed for official photographs with his hands tucked into his tunic. added cabinet meeting on new year's eve, the joint congressional committee on the conduct of the war spent more than 90 minutes asking hard questions about the situation and lincoln's answers left everyone shocked and unnerved. afterwards, attorney general edward bates setup into the night filling page after page of his diary. quote, the secretary of war and the president are kept in ignorance of the actual condition of the army and its intended m
on a scale of 1-10 on satisfaction. denmark tops the list at 10, canada at 9, u.s. at 8, france is 7 and japan is a 4. let's compare the satisfaction to the average marginal tax rates people pay in those countries. americans pay on average $41.7% when you factor in federal, state and local taxes, but the dans pay more, 48.1%. and so how come these guys are happier? danish taxes pay for pok post-secondary education. canadas taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. only the japanese actually make sense, they pay higher taxes, 47.2% and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of cnn's fareed zakaria gps and has a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. entitled "tough decisions." i asked him are american taxpayers getting their money's worth. >> imagine a guy in germany, probably he pays particularly if he's upper middle class or upper class, he probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpart. though it's not entirely clear once you add value-added consumption tax, f
the list at 10. my home, canada, comes in at 9. the u.s. comes in at an 8, france 7, and japan is a 4. let's compare that satisfaction to the average marginal tax rates people pay in those countries. americans pay on average 4 41.7 when you factor in federal, state, and local taxes. the danes pay more, 48.1%. how come they're happier? because it pays for free education, post secondary, canadi canadians, by the way, pay more than the u.s., as well, 46.4% in taxes. why are they happier? because their taxes pay for universal health care. the french pay fewer taxes than americans do and are less happy. we don't know why that happens. the japanese make sense. higher taxes, 47.2%, and they are less satisfied with what they end up with. fareed zakaria is the host of "fareed zakaria: gps." he's got a special on sunday at 8:00 p.m. and 11:00 p.m. eastern titled "tough decisions." i asked him, are american taxpayers getting their money's worth? >> imagine a guy in germany. probably he pays, particular pi upper middle class or upper class, probably pays more in total taxes than his american counterpa
through so that is some of the good news. frances dinglasan is in loser lisa this morning tracking the rain. >> pretty much gone now, so we are still picking up some returns south of san jose as live doppler 7-hd does a loop over the last few hours. roads are damp, cloudy and cool for the most part. we're not picking up much rain right now, just a few returns with areas of light green and blue. some of that is not reaching the ground. possibly light rain
and france have already put out staunch statements aimed at the israelis. the israelis are saying, yes, all these countries have voiced their concern. they're not saying that any of them have ever talked about recalling their ambassadors or anything of the like, but it's certainly the case that this area, this e1 area has for a very, vg very long time been controversial. yes, the israelis for a while gave some assurance that is there would be no construction there, but that ran out quite a while ago, and there are also israeli officials who are saying that in light of the vote at the united nations where the palestinians managed to get that upgraded status, that all of those assurances are null and void, michael. >> all of this pressure that's being put on. israel has been good at ignoring outside pressure on anything. i'm curious about the palestinian side. that u.n. status upgrade does, of course, given the palestinians potential access to a whole raft of u.n. bodies, including the international criminal court. what are the palestinians saying about their options going forward? >> well, t
the way other countries do. so we're essentially subsidizing like france and germany, for example because their governments have worked out a way to negotiate prices. so medicare, for example gets to set rates on payments to doctors and hospitals but doesn't have any power to negotiate rates on medical devices, drugs or durable medical equipment. so we don't have a market place wherein we have any leverage. ultimately, we pay more than other countries do for those things because we don't have any say. >> stephanie: also, you were talking about cost basically being arbitrary. you can pay $4,000 at one hospital. $15,000 at another. >> it should be infuriating. people should be angry about this. we have no idea what things really cost in this country. medically. so if you go to get a procedure or you have an emergency for god forbid and you end up in an emergency room, you're not price checking. you're going -- you're going to get fixed or healed. >> stephanie: i have a gushing head injury. maybe i should go shop
in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to an independent in georgia, al. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get through. it was on the heels of you going to atlanta and to chast
to reduce that to 25%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. like france is not where we want to be on tax policy. the canadians are at 17%. where you have high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and on the individual side. we will over time take the corporate rate to 25 from 35. because it will be better for growth, we will actually have more revenue for the government and not less. with government growth at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over last 20 years or obama over last four, you do that for decades, the federal cabinet raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government at such strong, robust and jobs-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats have taken the opposite direction over the last four years. that's why we are in this mess. host: now to al, an independent in georgia. if i would push the right button. sorry about that. al, good morning. caller: good morning. the last time you were on c- span, i managed to get thr
, and spain and italy, and france. they all grow slow of the they have extremely high unemployment rates. we would have a slow economy and high unemployment forever if we taxed ourselves like that. gregg: all right. >> this idea that somehow you can't tax the middle class or we won't, it's impossible. if we keep --. gregg: that is a bad idea, right, i get it. i get it. vat. that i get. >> value-added tax is the worst thing. gregg: brian, what is the solution? >> yeah. i, well, if i were king for a day and told to make the economy grow faster, i would cut the size of our federal government. we need to cut spending everywhere because, the best our economy has done in the last 30 years is during the '80s and '90s. that's when ronald reagan and bill clinton cut spending. i would take the clinton tax rates, right now, i would take them. gregg: really. >> they won't hurt the economy, if, i got clinton's spending. he spent one-third less on federal government than barack obama is today, one-third less. we've increased the size of the government by over 33%. gregg:er hereby announce you king for a d
to consider 15% or something like that. france passed a thing if you go over $1 million a year, your taxes are low on the first million. after that, they are taking 75% of the money. they ought to throw a little bit of fear into these people. it just shows the control the wealthy have over the government in both parties. host: more from "the washington post." they write -- back to the telephones. derrick from maryland on the line for democrats. your thoughts about the fiscal clause bill. caller: i think they will do a good deal if they can keep mitch mcconnell out of there. one of the things i really have a problem with, that is when thing i say democrats, let's get the ground game for 2014. republicansd of the at enter the house. let's take the house and just ran it all down their throats. host: we will move onto glen on the line for independents. caller: here is the problem that we have a. we have people that are working hard for the american people. we have a constitution. we have deviated from the constitution. host: who are the people working hard for the american people? caller: the
day google france you can't build your own app friends you define your own app. >> juice content and that france and th app is ready to install owe created this apph some of my friends who have a similar goal. as time goes on we can encourage each other. >> if that is your new year's resolution it can get that accomplished on and they want. >> a lorry segall laue segtal. gall. >> a program reminder coming up at the kron 4 news dr. phil. you could get a brand new episodes weekdays at 4 in the afternoon. >> welcome back to the kron four normorning news. >> time for 38 and a list of worst to be banished from the queen's english or misuse, overuse and general usefulness you--use less nsf and this will alert spoiler is on oone of the words on that list. >> others include kick the can down the road, trending and bucket list. super food, a ballroom, jock there is a double down. >> the for is receiving the most votes is a cliff. >> the non-binding tongue in cheek list is released every year by northern michigan's lake superior state university. >> kim karsashian is 12 weeks longer pregna
and israelis are worried as well. cooperation from france and britain, other nato countries as well, we have clearly been planning for contingency operations. it may be that whatever it is that the administration has uncovered about what assad is doing with his chemical weapons stockpiles, a decision has to be made. i don't think we should wait until assad starts using them. we have to do something to prevent the use. because if he unleashes chemical weapons against the opposition, and he eventually falls, the prospect of an opposition bloodbath, which are already very high, i think it becomes overwhelming. megyn: before i let you go, just to reiterate, you don't think that bashar al-assad is incapable of this? when i speak of the torture -- we have seen the bodies lined up, people with their arms tied behind their back, murdered in cold blood -- children, 9-year-olds being shot in the head. as their parents watch. other children made to watch as their parents are murdered in front of them -- babies -- reports go on and on. too gruesome for 1:00 p.m. eastern time. they're just so our viewers
moore show"? he voiced over that. he lives in france. bill: new concerns the u.s. is running out of doctors at a time when obama-care will put millions of americans into the system. our fox news medical a-team doctor on what needs to happen there. martha: they were trapped under a car struggling to breathe and split second heroics saved theof lives of her mother and child. of pepto-bismol to-go. bp has paid overthe people of bp twenty-threeitment to the gulf. billion dollars to help those affected and to cover cleanup costs. today, the beaches and gulf are open, and many areas are reporting their best tourism seasons in years. d bp's also committed to america. we support nearly 250,000 jobs and invest more here than anywhere else. we're working to fuel america for generations to come. our commitment has never been stronger. martha: this year was so big the honor went to two words, capitalism and socialism. the web traffic of people looking up the definition of socialism and capitalism doubled last year. bill: i guess we call that fair and balanced. consult your dictionary. new qu
enlisted in the only second regimental combat team. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded the distinguished service cross, which was later upgraded to the medal of honor. the highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduated from the university of hawaii and the george washington university law school. when hawaii became a state on august 21, 1959, daniel inouye won elections for the united states house of representatives is the new states first congressman. later collected the united states senate in 1962, he currently is serving his eighth term in the united states senate. in our earlier interview is in the series, other people we have spoken to have talked about the first time they were sworn in as a member of congress. in 1959, he became the first member from hawaii. what was that like when you were first on the floor of the house of representatives? >> i have never been on the floor of the chamber, and so it was an awesome experience for me to be among a
short. >> i had a chance to see a lot of my family in france. >> the holiday has been really good. >> i was here visiting my brother and our family was out of minnesota. >> for those of you who are leaving and for the most part of the airport manager told me that the are arriving flights are on time. if they stated that the only delays are for those that are headed to newark. they are at an hour delay. this is the pitcher perfect way to end a vacation is for you to our arrived home safely. >> officials have been scrambling to repair a levee in east palo alto that was breached during heavy rains over the weekend. crews placed sandbags where the san francisco creek topple the levy. sunday is the flooding forced people in seven homes to evacuate. kron4 alicia reid is in east palo alto with the latest period >> this has collapsed and the home behind it is clearly cleared out. >> a weekend of flooding caused-- >> the next couple of days our staff will be working with the owners in order to begin some of the repairs that are necessary. >> six other families were evacuated and there now and ho
france winner was stripped of his titles, lost his sponsorships and left the board of his famous cancer charity live strong, after the u.s. anti-doping agency found he engaged in a long term pattern of blood doping during his career. armstrong still denies using performance-enhancing drugs. >>> number seven, wrong side of the street. few things are more universal for american children than sesame street and elmo. which makes the elmo sex scandal all the more shocking. kevin clash resigned as the voice of elmo after allegations he had sexual contact with underaged males. the show says no one there knew anything about it. >>> number six, congress behaving badly. the whiff of scandal doesn't mean you can't win a race for congress. jesse jackson jr. of illinois was re-elected even though he was absent for months due to mental health issues and under federal investigation for misusing congressional resources. weeks after the election he resigned. prolife republican congressman of tennessee had urged his pregnant mistress to get an abortion a decade ago. he denied the woman was pregnant or ha
lori rothman and melissa frances and in the next hour. there should be comments about what you have on your television screen. dennis: that is a former senator. this is america. we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in thfirst place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur you won't just find us online, you'll also find us in person, with dedicated support teams at over 500 branches nationwide. so when you call or visit, you can ask for a name you know. because personal service starts with a real person. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our support teams are nearby, ready to help. it's no wondero many investors are saying... [ all ] i'm with scottrade. %3 melissa: good afternoon, i am melissa francis. lori: i am lori rothman. the president saying we can get a fiscal cliff deal done in one week but wall street not so sure. recession warning coming up.
person with a ph.d. in engineering from france. dick also started to all different committees. -- they also started 12 different committees. judiciary, committee on finance, and they were working on a number of products. i love today to talk about those projects those councils are working on. >> can we say a few words between the relationship of this council and the military? what we specifically referred to as the free syrian army? >> a few months ago they found it coalesce. it is headed up by the inspector general. all of those groups do maintain their separate identities. they are all fighting under the banner of this council. i would say the relationship is characterized it has two characteristics, if corroborative one and a competitive one. if it were not for that there would be no federated areas. everyone depends on the fsa to keep the assad regime from entering the city. that is the cooperative aspect. this is going into the future. you have an emergent civil society that is trying to govern this and provide basic goods and services. when i was an uphill i saw piles up
states army in the great world war i. he wanted to get to france as soon as he could and so he volunteered to be in the ambulance service. what he did when he got to europe was rescue and pick up other dough boys in europe out of those trenches and get them behind, take them back behind american lines so that they could be taken care of their wounds and he also picked up many of our americans, 114,000 to be exact that died in the great world war i. he was allowed or was able to come back to america alive he made it through the war. although many, as i mentioned, did not. many americans when they came home from the great war over there, as cohen said, difed the new. they picked up in europe in fact many of them a great number of them depride the spanish flu, almost as many as died in europe itself. frank buckles then went to work and during his work, he went to the philippines. when he was in the philippines, the japanese invaded in world war ii. he was captured and put in a prisoner of war camp for three and a half years. he was about to be executed and the americans came and l
%. the reason is the average business tax in europe is 25%. stupider than france is not where we want to be. canadians are at 17%. when you have these high marginal tax rates, it slows economic growth. you can see it on the corporate side and the individual side. i think we will over time take the corporate rate to 25% from 35%. because it will be better for growth, we will have more revenue for the government, not less. if the government grows at 4% per year, reagan levels, versus 2% per year, france over the last years. do that for a decade, the federal government raises $5 trillion in additional tax revenue. the best way to get revenue for the government is a strong, robust, job-creating economic growth. unfortunately, president obama and the democrats are taking the opposite direction over the last four years and that is why we are in the mess we are in. host: al is an independent in georgia. please go ahead. i need to push the right button. sorry about that, al. hang on. you are on "washington journal". caller: good morning. the last time i managed to get through was on the heels of yo
for broke regiment. he saw combat in italy and southern france and was badly wounded during an engagement for which he was awarded a distinguished service cross of which was later upgraded to the medal of honor, our highest award for military valor. with financial assistance from the g.i. bill, inouye graduated from the university of hawaii and the george washington university law school. daniel inouye won election to the united states house of representatives as the united -- the new state's first congressman. he is currently serving his eighth term in the united states senate. other people we have spoken to have talked about the first time they were sworn in as a member of congress. in 1959, you became the first member from hawaii. what was that like when you work first on the floor of the house of representatives? >> i spent some time in washington before this. i went to law school. i had never been on the floor of the chamber. it was an awesome experience for me to be among a multitude of giants and have teh speaker of the house swear me in. it was a simple ceremony, but i will never
then offered him the position as ambassador to france. >> researcher and author michael hill on elihu washburne, the only diplomat from a major power to stay during the siege of paris providing political and humanitarian support. >> "washington journal" continues. host: ari ne'eman is the president and co-founder of the autistics of advocacy network and is here to talk to us about the federal response to the rise in autism in the united states. our guest is an autistic adults and will be talking about the federal role in supporting an autistic adults and children. he testified before congress earlier this week, and that hearing was covered by c-span if you want to take a look at it. go to our website, c-span.org. thank you for being on the program. >> thank you for having me. >> first, talk to us about what is autism in terms of the spectrum of disorders and some of the symptoms people might want to be on the lookout for. >> i am really glad you asked that. often, people's perceptions of autism come from television or movies like "main man -- "rain man" or 60-second public service announcements
, keep the money here in the united states where we needed instead of trying to buy air france. >> host: how much money are responding militarily overseas? >> we have basic architecture of 750 bases scattered around the globe. is that oversees spending, not overseas spending? i still hear, spend it there. i'd like to count that. if you're talking about foreign aid, as it's sometimes called to my f-1 assistance program comes to about 5 percent of our gross domestic product faugh. if i said $26 billion it sounds like a lot of money, but the biggest department of defense appropriations $6,507,000,000,000 is a drop in the bucket. as a proportion of our total federal budget is six -- it is extremely small. so, you know, it is a common misperception in the american public that we spend a lot of money in foreign aid. in fact, if people it says we spend 15-25 percent of the budget on foreign aid. it is nowhere close to that. such than a single percentage point of our entire gdp, extremely small, so from my point of view on the whole that is a worthy investment, but it is not a very large one. >
or napoleon's france, alexander the great mesopotamia. it is a progressive thing every society seems to go through. it goes from civilize to being uncivilized. host: beyond the disrespect you feel that you got as a kid to -- from the kids, what did you think about the security at the school? did you feel safe from perhaps an attack from the outside? caller: they had the doors locked. you had to ring a bell before you came in. if anybody wants to get into one of the schools and they come in with weapons, these military type equipment, there is no door that will stop them anyway. they can shoot the locks right off the door and they will be into the school within seconds. once somebody is going to do something like that that has their mind set on it, to stop it is next to impossible. there is no way of forcing it. i wish there was, but it is like terrorism. when somebody wants to create an act of terrorism, there is basically no way of stopping them. host: we will move on to joy in california. caller: good morning first. i would like to send out my condolences to all of the children and loved
he used performance-enhancing drugs. when that ban was imposed, armstrong's seven tour de france victories were erased. armstrong has signaled that he has no intention of 'peeling the ban before today's deadline. >> and some of the french folks armstrong may have rode past are breaking a holiday season taboo and selling their unwanted presents. >> they might be on to something there. that's exactly what they were doing at this store in paris yesterday. patrons saying it's better than regifting. and during tough economic times, they've got a point, any bit of money really counts. >> and 52% of french people are planning to make money from their gifts. and maybe the other 48% are lying about it. here's the deal. you all know you've gotten a bad christmas present before. i have family members, you will remain nameless because we're on national television right now, and you're like, what am i supposed to do with this? and if you could make some money off of it, i would think they would be happy for you if you could make money off of it. instead of just throwing it out. >> regifting i
and france are about to go in recession. when you have a shaky economy, piling on taxes does not work. spain's has been raising taxes. we have not seen anything like this with governments deliberately raising taxes on a scale since the early 1930's. they should be going in the opposite direction. they are putting more burdens on the private economies. host: somebody who may be in your income group wrote an op-ed about a month ago and this is part of it. i want to get your reaction. guest: in terms of income and what people effectively pay in tax rates, people and higher incomes pay effective tax rates three times those earning middle incomes in this country. salaried income versus capital gains gets confused. capital gains are no sure things. it is a high-risk proposition. there has always been a lower rate for capital gains. you would see this economy crater and hope of investment and go by the boards. bill clinton lowered the tax rates. to reverse that trend, that was a bad decade, the 1970 's. we have seen that in other countries. raise the rates and you get less investment and a lower st
to fight against the tax increase for the wealthiest people. they take a ski vacation in france and a cost $20,000. they spend money like it is garbage. cheerleading for tax breaks for people who do not need it. they have admitted they do not need it. the republicans and the democrats are not facing the key issue with our budget, which is medical cost. it is insanity we do not hear enough and i wish c-span would have more programs dealing with all of the options that could lessen the burden on the government and the taxpayer for the medical costs. i believe that in medicare buy- in -- i have 10 years left to go until medicare. i pay $620 a month for my health care. that is a lot of money. i would give that to the government and would usn't use t $100 or $200 a year. host: that is an important issue. we will focus more as the affordable care act t kicks in. for the suggestion -- thank you for the suggestion. the deficit is close to $16.4 trillion. this is part of the debate we will see at the start of the new congress. the so-called fiscal cliff was coined by ben bernanke. the story from "r
and france >>host: good luck with that >>caller: yes i saw them and they look so beautiful i am sure that they will enjoy them >>host: they will love them and you can share the story >>caller: yes i will tell them that i saw how ited >>host: they are a natural treasure. most jewelry is made in other parts of the world.we can support an american in mind an american company these are mined in new york and then the jewelry is made in i can only talk about that with turquoise that is made by native american indians. that is the only comparable jewelry i can think of to share >>caller: i am right near new york i am not far from where they have been mined >>host: yes it is up in your neck of the west thank you for calling >>guest: at a great christmas >>host: when you think about this is so unique. there is nothing else like this in the world.at $50 there is hard to find jewelry at that price. you get these uniquely rare (...)these are so that and more rare than any of the stone we sell.cannot call them all herkimer if they do not come from the herkimer mine in new york >>guest:
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